Ben's Beer Blog

A place for all things beer.


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Cowbell Brewery might be Ontario’s most ambitious beer venture yet

Stephen Rich is excited.

When we meet at Bungalow, a bar near my house in our shared hometown of London, Ontario, Rich is clearly excited to tell me about his newest venture, Cowbell Brewing.

The meeting, back in July of last year, is the first of a handful and a culmination of a series of emails between me and Rich trying to find a time that works for both of us. It’s an exceedingly difficult task given that, even then, over a year before the brewery is slated to open, Rich, the brewery’s Brewmaster and Director of Brewing Operations, was splitting his time between Toronto and Blyth, where ground had just recently been broken to build the fledgling brewery, and the fact that I have a toddler and a full time job and often reject activities that involve interacting directly with other humans.

But Rich is undeterred.

The emails continue until finally we find a time when he is in town to visit family and I actually have a free evening. He really wants to tell me about Cowbell.

Indeed, Stephen Rich usually really wants to tell me–and anyone else who will listen–about a lot of things. He’s got a great beer you need to try, he knows a good beer festival in the state you’re travelling to, he wants you to come by his house, he’s got some cigars, you should meet his awesome dog.

The first couple times you meet Rich, your impression might the same one I had, namely, “Is this guy for real?”

Because enthusiasm like Rich’s is kind of rare in the world of Ontario craft beer. Brewers are passionate people, sure, but the sort of “everything-is-great-let-me-tell-you-about-it” spirit that Rich embodies seems practically put on at times. He’s like a perennially upbeat Jay Leno in an industry full of cynical, angry stand-up comics.

After working for an investment firm after university, Rich came onto the Ontario beer scene during a period of unemployment when he launched the blog “DefinitionAle.” From there he worked at Spearhead, then was the brewmaster at the Molson-owned Beer Academy / Six Pints, and then Sweetgrass Brewing Co.

One of the first things I heard about Stephen Rich was something of a minor controversy (among beer nerds, at least) when someone realized that, while he was working at Spearhead, he was also rating the company’s beers as perfect fives on the beer-rating app Untappd—which, yes, is kind of a dick move. But the first time I met him, by then in the middle of his Beer Academy stint, it kind of made sense. I didn’t get the vibe that Rich was an underhanded or sneaky guy, just someone who was really, really into beer and very happy to talk about it. His beer, your beer, the last beer you had, the next beer you’re going to try. Of course Stephen Rich was enthusiastic about the beer made by the company for which we worked. Stephen Rich, it seemed clear, is enthusiastic about all beer.

And so when I meet Rich last July, I am prepared for grandiose plans—the previous time we spoke he had big ideas for Sweetgrass Brewing to make the jump from contract brewing to bricks and mortar before he and that company ultimately parted ways—, but I wasn’t quite ready for the vision Rich laid out for Cowbell that night.

Over more than a couple pints, Rich detailed the vision for a sprawling destination brewery. There were plans to grow some of their own ingredients on site, there was talk of a a coolship, the possibility for cattle on site for some reason, and the size of the place seemed to defy all my expectations for a potential new brewery in Blyth, Ontario. Even for Stephen Rich, it all sounded very ambitious.

The second time Rich and I meet for beers, because yes, he wants to tell me more, he has brought along Steven and Grant Sparling, the father and son owners of Cowbell and two generations of the family that for three generations, owned Sparling’s Propane. That company, which was Ontario’s second largest propane retailer in Ontario, delivered more than 120 million litres of propane annually and was acquired by Parkland Fuel Corporation in 2013. The Sparlings also appear to own most of the real estate in the town of Blyth. I didn’t argue when they offered to pick up the tab.

Despite the free beer, my second meeting with Cowbell folks is perhaps even stranger than my first, in that, rather than temper Rich’s unbridled enthusiasm, Steven and Grant Sparling actually confirm everything he’s saying—and add on considerably more.

The Sparlings tell me about their desire to build North America’s first carbon-neutral brewery. They outlay their plans to track every delivery driver’s mileage and to plant trees to offset the carbon. They talk about being Canada’s first “closed loop” brewery that will actually pull all the water they use to brew from an in-house well, and then will process it onsite with a treatment facility they designed and built themselves. They speak passionately about their desire to build up Blyth and create jobs there. They detail plans to have children’s sports fields on the grounds of their multi-acre brewery, create a destination site with sustainable materials and wood shipped in from the west coast. It’s almost unbelievable and the more they talk, the more their idea seems totally fucking crazy. But also, the more they talk, the more it becomes clear that all three of them are deadly serious.

Now, in six years writing about craft beer, I have met with a lot of dudes (and yes, they’re almost all dudes) who have laid out grandiose plans for the brewery they’re building. I’ve learned that, if the talks are any further out than say, six months, it’s probably best to just consider what they’re saying “wish list” items and then check in again when the doors are about to open for a bit of a reality check. The meeting with the Sparlings is surreal for two reasons: first, I’ve never heard plans of this scale in Ontario before, and second, I leave the meeting certain that they are actually going to do it. At the end of the night, maybe sensing that what they’ve said is virtually unbelievable—or maybe just because they want to show it off—they actually even take me to Steven’s vehicle to show me a scale model of the place.

I press them on some things during our chat, but they have an answer for virtually everything I throw at them. Steven Sparling speaks almost as if reading talking points, he says things like this, off the cuff, with complete earnestness:

“We are building on a space that used to be a working cattle farm, and farmers are true stewards of the land. If you don’t care for the land, you don’t have a crop. You don’t have a crop, you don’t have a living. So in keeping with the history of the farm, we intend to be good stewards of the land as well. It’s been quite exciting.”

Grant, who is technically Cowbell’s General Manager and Vice-President, abandoned his initial plans to join the US Navy after college and, instead, wrote the business case for Cowbell, noting the untapped economic potential in Huron County and the fact that craft beer is the LCBO’s fastest growing category. Accordingly, shortly after graduation from Dartmouth, he started the program at BrewLab in Sunderland, England, graduating from the program as a brewer. Prior to Cowbell, Grant Sparling owned and operated “ThirstD,” a drink-delivery service at Dartmouth College, and was CEO of a pharmaceutical company called Medicine for a Better Tomorrow.

Did I mention he’s only 24 years old?

Interestingly, I’m not the only one who gets an opportunity to interrogate the Sparlings that evening. As it happens, Muskoka Brewery has taken their sales team on a pub crawl through London that evening and they happen to be at Bungalow and come by our table to chat. The group is mostly sales reps, but also includes Todd Lewin, then VP of Sales and Marketing and now president of the company. After I introduce Rich and the Sparlings, and explain they’re building a brewery in Blyth with a 50 hectolitre brewhouse, the team from Bracebridge politely peppers them and Rich with questions. It’s all very professional, but there is a sense that the established brewers are sniffing out a new player—and one that is aiming to be the fifth or sixth largest independent brewery in the province in less than a year. Steven Sparling is unflappable. It’s actually kind of awesome. We part ways and I can tell the Muskoka folks are thinking what I have been; namely, “Who the fuck are these guys?”

I tell the Sparlings they can probably expect more scrutiny like that and they obviously already know. Steven says something to the effect of “That’s fine,” but he says it in a way that suggests “Bring it on.” Steven’s got a kindly older dude vibe, like Wilfred Brimley in the Quaker Oats commercials, but I don’t imagine you run Ontario’s second largest propane retailer without a touch of ruthlessness and I get the sense there’s also a Wilfred-Brimley-from-the-movie-The-Firm side to him. He’s not deterred. When I tell them that no one does what they’re doing—no one ever starts a brewery on a scale like this, Grant Sparling says, “We’re aware that this is quite a privilege and it’s been years getting here. But we’re committed.”

Well, no shit.

A year later and Cowbell Brewery is about to open its doors to the public on August 7th. It’s abundantly clear they’ve done everything they said they were going to do. The brewery occupies a 111-acre plot of land. That is not a typo. The brewery sits on one hundred eleven acres of land that will one day soon include a working farm that grows ingredients for the beer. The building is a 26,000 square foot destination brewery that includes not just the aforementioned 50 hec brewhouse but also two restaurants, Henry’s Hall and Mil’s Verandah, with a capacity for 180 people. There’s also three event spaces: Thresher’s Hall, The Loft, and Cowbell Cellar, an event venue on the brewery floor with a private patio. There’s a bar and a “General Store” retail space with not only a growler filling station, but also, presumably, myriad swag. I’ve already seen Cowbell-branded cycling jerseys on instagram.

This is, to put it lightly, new territory for Ontario craft beer. No one has done anything like this before. The handful of independent breweries in the province that are this big or bigger—Muskoka, Great Lakes, Steam Whistle, Amsterdam, etc— all took years to get where they are. Cowbell has all this established before they open the doors.

Furthermore, Cowbell is in fact the world’s first closed loop brewing system by virtue of the fact that they draw their own water and then treat it to use it again, meaning they don’t use municipal resources for water. Cowbell is also North America’s first carbon neutral brewery thanks to the thousands of trees that have been planted on site in the lead up to their launch to offset their carbon footprint and a stringent audit process they pay a third party to undertake. Oh, and the beer is pretty good, too. They’ve already developed three of Rich’s recipes that were contract-brewed at Collective Arts in Hamilton—a Kolsch-style beer, a Red IPA, and a Hefeweizen—all of which were good and to my mind, have been consistently so.

It’s honestly hard not to write all this and not come off like I’m writing a press release for the company, but I’m literally just listing their achievements. I haven’t even mentioned that they will make their own craft sodas, they have their own nitro-infused cold brew, and everyone who serves beer there will receive Cicerone certification.

It’s fucking beer Disney World.

And therein, perhaps, lies the rub. Because Disney World isn’t “cool.” It’s not punk rock and indie in the way we we’ve come to frame the “craft vs. big guy” dichotomy. We’re largely used to our craft brewers being home brewers or people who quit their jobs to invest a modest sum and make a life change. Instead, Cowbell is something entirely new, but I think, is poised to change the conversation about beer in Ontario. Cowbell is big, sure, but it’s still ticking all the right boxes for most folks who prefer craft beer. The beer is well made and the plan is to make a rotating lineup of small batch beers (and they have resources to continue to make them well). They’ve built an environmentally friendly business in Ontarion and created 150 jobs doing it. And, perhaps most importantly, you can bet that when they start to flood Huron County and the surrounding area with local beer, more than a few Molson and Labatt taps will be taken over and more than a few locals will be converted to craft beer.

So no, the Sparlings and their Beer Disney World aren’t your typical Ontario craft beer startup, but the fact that the Sparlings have seen the potential for craft beer in Ontario to the tune of building this insanely ambitious company, and the fact that they’ve paid attention to doing it right, to me speaks volumes about where this industry is going.

It’s no wonder Stephen Rich is so excited. Any beer loving Ontarian ought to be, really.


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Gingera for Redheads


#BEERFORGINGERS

Gingera is a representation of a redhead’s delicate physicality and a ginger’s fiery disposition. The two contrasting tempers, present in the redhead essence, are depicted through the pale, translucent bottle and spicy, unfiltered taste.

Gingera was born to prove that redheads can succeed anywhere without having to adapt and sacrifice just because they were born with a slight mutation of the MC1R gene on chromosome 16.

Redheads have long been disregarded in the sun- and patio- loving beer industry just because they burn more easily when exposed to UV rays and can’t absorb sufficient Vitamin D due to low concentrations of eumelanin in their body. But owing to determination and the fact that their hair is red, are now poised to redefine the perception of beer. Continue reading


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Alberta gov issues fines for inducement, governing body in Ontario confirms they never have

Breweries providing cash and incentives in exchange for exclusivity in bars and pubs is an ingrained part of the beer industry.

I’ve written about this a few times over the years (most recently last week for my bi-weekly column Full Pour in the Metroland Media publication Our London). If you’re new to this issue (or my impotent ranting on the subject), the TL;DR version is this: if you’re sitting in a bar that has dedicated all of its draught lines to one particular brewery or are sitting in a pub that seems to be decorated entirely in swag from one particular company, you can virtually guarantee that cash and / or incentives were provided to that bar in exchange for space on that draught lineup.

The kicker here, of course, is that this entire practice is technically illegal per Ontario’s liquor licence act, specifically Regulation 720:

A manufacturer of liquor or an agent or employee of a manufacturer shall not directly or indirectly offer or give a financial or material inducement to a person who holds a licence or permit under the Act or to an agent or employee of the person for the purpose of increasing the sale or distribution of a brand of liquor.

Again, this isn’t new ground and is something I’ve been talking about since roughly January of 2013 when I wrote the post, In Toronto Pubs, Breweries Battle for Beer Taps With Persuasion and Cash, for the website Torontoist.

In the roughly four years since I wrote that post, nothing has changed about the prevalence of the practice except that, for the first time in my beer writing career, I’ve learned two fairly interesting things about penalties for inducements:

  1. A fine was actually issued to a Canadian brewery for this practice in May, and
  2. The Alcohol and Gaming Commission of Ontario (AGCO) has apparently never issued monetary penalties in response to inducements.

Continue reading


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A conversation with Richard Sigesmund of Gleemer Imports

If you’re a fan of craft beer in Ontario and have spent any amount of time participating in the conversation about the scene online, it’s likely you’ve run into Richard Sigesmund.

A perennial critic of the province’s beer scene, Sigesmund generally isn’t afraid to tell anyone how he really feels about a certain beer, brewery, or trend and, on occasion, the conversation has been known to get a little heated. As of this post, for example, he has unfriended me on Facebook (though we still trade barbs on twitter and we chatted via email for this post).

To call him a fan of Belgian beer would likely be putting it lightly. Sigesmund travels to the region at least once a year and interned as a brewer there. He’s also an avid home brewer and has collaborated on a few brews with Toronto’s Muddy York brewing. And while he’s fairly quick to share his thoughts on the superior beer scene in other regions, unlike most Ontario beer-critiquing twitteratti or self-righteous beer bloggers (ahem), Sigesmund is poised to put his money where his mouth is later this year when he officially launchers Gleemer Imports, his very own Ontario beer agency “importing liquid happiness from Belgium and beyond.”

I chatted with the fledgling agency owner to see what we might be able to expect from Ontario’s newest beer importer. Continue reading


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Five more points about contract brewing

Last week, I wrote a piece for  the Globe and Mail about contract brewing, the practice wherein brewing companies or virtual breweries rent space from larger facilities to make their beer.

Given the constraints of the 800 words I was alotted, there was much I did not have time to dig in on and so the final piece was something of an overview of the practice, with some brief discussion of why it might be growing in popularity–especially in Ontario–with some insight from a business owner, Shehan De Silva of Lost Craft Beer, who has had success with this model, and from a bricks and mortar brewery owner, Jason Fisher of the Indie Ale House, who is generally opposed to this model for what he feels it brings (or doesn’t) to the industry as a whole.

The article was intentionally targeted at the Globe and Mail’s “general audience” and so much of the beer geekery I might have dug in on was omitted. Accordingly the responses from beer industry folks on twitter, Facebook, and my email were passionate and varied. Interestingly, the article seemed to simply confirm everyone’s beliefs no matter which side of the argument you might be on. Both virtual brewers and bricks and mortar brewers have reached out to me in the interim to say I had represented their side well (Not to toot my own horn, but beep fucking beep).

Also of interest, one owner of a contract brewing facility says he was subsequently inundated with calls from interested new brewing companies. Er, sorry / you’re welcome, Ontario?

Anyway, here are some mostly random tidbits I had hoped to include but couldn’t. Continue reading


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Are beer drinking Saskatchewan football fans getting a rough ride?

Beer drinking fans of Saskatchewan’s CFL team appear to be getting something of a rough ride when it comes to their choices this season.

That’s because the Roughriders’ new stadium, which opened in August of 2016 and is slated to host its first regular season CFL game on Canada Day, appears poised to pour Molson-Coors products exclusively, despite much lip-service paid to craft brewers in the run up to Mosaic Stadium’s opening.

Now, exclusivity in arenas and stadiums likely won’t be all that shocking to most readers given that in Canada we’ve become accustom to a team entering a “partnership” with either Molson or Labatt (despite the fact that it is technically illegal in Ontario). Jays fans will note the all AB-InBev beer lineup at the Rogers Centre and fondly recall the shit show that resulted when the organization dared to offer Steam Whistle for one glorious season.

But the Saskatchewan Roughriders aren’t a privately owned team run by Canada’s biggest telecommunications company and their new stadium isn’t owned by any private entity. Continue reading


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How to talk to your friend about drinking shitty beer

Have you noticed that a friend or family member is still drinking beers like Budweiser, Molson Canadian, Coors Light, Miller Light, or even Pabst?

It can be difficult watching someone you care about drink shitty industrial lager. You may feel torn about how to discuss foreign ownership, adjuncts, and the fact that much more interesting beer exists. But while the conversation about dad beers is never an easy one, it’s necessary.

Before talking to your friend about their shitty drinking habits, it’s important to understand that they may not realize they have a problem. Some people happily picking up a 2-4 with a NASCAR shirt in it or grabbing a “suitcase” of “crushable” cans for a trip to the cottage may deny they have a problem entirely. Regardless of your friend’s reaction, stay calm and know that you have their best interest in mind.

First and foremost, collect your thoughts and think about what you’re going to say ahead of time. A supportive message will be received better than negative, hurtful language. This is a difficult time for your friend, so your reassurance will help them realize they’re not alone. Millions of people have learned to put down the industrial lagers and drink well-made, interesting beer. Macro abuse should be discussed sooner rather than later. The earlier you have the conversation, the quicker your friend can seek treatment and start accompanying you on brew pub visits, ordering flights of small batch beer, and taking part in your bottle shares. Continue reading